The ‘Dirty Dancing’ is one baby that should’ve stayed in her corner.

Dirty_Dancing_2017.pngDirty Dancing is a musical re-imagining of the 1987 film.

What a film.

What a horrible barbarity.

Seriously?

I sat through this film for the cast: Abigail Breslin, who I’ve loved ever since I saw her in Little Miss Sunshine and Debra Messing, who was ever so brilliant in short lived and little known Smash as well as her Will & Grace. That and to support Australian’s in cinema, especially indigenous Australian’s in cinema, with director Wayne Blair. It may have the actors, but they lack the connection between the characters. With this unnecessary remake, it has no heart, class, taste, or magic.

Simply put, it just feels plain wrong. When the film gets it so right the first time, whats the point in continuing? If you want to relive the magic, watch the original. There’s no need to remake it for a modern audience or attempt to sequel it in the forgotten Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights.

Whatever ABC were looking for in remaking this movie because Colt Prattes’ Johnny Castle held no charisma or swagger of his character. Although Breslin is a formidble actress, and one that I clearly love, it’s so unfortunate that she’s so unsuited to this role. If they’d switched Breslin with Sarah Hyland, who plays Breslin’s sister, it might’ve been something different. And the dancing’s pitiful, lacking in every way.

This is just a painful imitation that you could tell would never work from the very beginning. The only way you’ll be able to un-see this film is to watch the original and remind you what a timeless, cheesy classic it is.

This is one baby that should’ve stayed in her corner.

Film-O-Meter: 2/10.

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‘Spooks’ doesn’t reach an audience outside of the UK.

Spooks: The Greater Good follows Will Holloway as he teams up with disgraced MI5 Intelligence Chief Harry Pearce to track down an escaped terrorist during a routine handover before the terrorist executes an attack on London.

To be quite honest, I honestly only saw this film because of Kit Harrington. And a small cameo from Lara Pulver, who you might recognise from an episode or two of BBC’s Sherlock. And to spot places in London that I had been to. I hadn’t seen the long running TV show and hadn’t even heard of it before I moved to England. Having not seen or heard of the show before, the film still worked for me and it was a good standalone film.

From what I’ve read, and from my experience of the film, you don’t have needed to have seen the show in order to understand what was going on. It has a decent enough storyline that builds up to some intense final moments. And Harrington definitely is able to prove himself fit for the role and breaking out from his “Jon Snow” role he is known for, but I think he already did this (breaking out from what we know him as) in a film that was released earlier this year in Testament of Youth.

For me, the film worked. But it wasn’t truly anything special. What did lift the film was it’s excellent cinematography, which is always a vast improvement from television to film adaptions. There’s more of a budget to allow for such things.

All in all, however, there are so many films of the spy genre that Spooks might get lost amongst its competition. Although the film did build to the final moments into the break into MI5, it somehow didn’t feel smart enough or enough of a threat to really keep me on the edge of the seat.

As said, the film worked. And British audience will enjoy it but it may not reach a market outside of the country.

Film-O-Meter: 6/10

‘Allegiant’ was a disappointing cinema experience.

Allegiant tells the story of Tris who must escape with Four, after the earth-shattering revelations of Insurgent, beyond the wall that encircles Chicago to finally discover the shocking truth of what lies behind it.

Let me just start of by saying this wasn’t the film that I was expecting to see after I’d read the books two years ago, just prior to the release of the initial film in the series, Divergent. You know that if a review starts off like this, the adaptation wasn’t a well received one.

The first in the series, Divergent, was a decent adaptation, following the familiar set up of the world as described in the novel and unable to escape its comparisons to blockbuster franchiseThe Hunger Games. Casting choices of Shailene Woodley as protagonist Tris was a mis-casting as her performance stiff and unemotional, barely showcasing a strength to carry the film. She’s hardly aided by the charisma Theo James provides as Four, even though he’s clearly the best thing of this film despite the supporting acting talent in both Naomi Watts and Jeff Bridges. Ansel Elgort, who plays Caleb her brother, was another poor choice as they seemed an odd pairing to play brother and sister. The only agreements to be made was that of Theo James as Four, Maggie Q as Tori, as well as Miles Teller as Peter, who was aptly able to carry the comedic elements of the film required of him. The new addition of Jeff Daniels as David was interesting but he was unable to give his full potential under a weak direction and poor script, looking progressively fed up with the film, almost mirroring the audiences feelings with the film also.

From the three out of four films released so far, Divergent clearly wins as each progression of the story becomes weaker as that feeling of something missing within the films construction becoming more of a prominent feature. Hopefully in the switch up of a director from Robert Schwentke to Lee Toland Krieger will provide an improvement to the series but I highly doubt this will be effective so late in the series.

One thing that baffled my friend and I, who accompanied me to the cinema, was the decision behind why they split the last book into two films. We thought the reasoning behind it might have been that it was following the example set up like many other young adult adaptations before it – whether it be Harry PotterTwilight, or even the aforementioned The Hunger Games. But the thing is, is that Allegiant just didn’t need it. The film could’ve ended perfectly at this film without a follow up.

The special effects were especially fake, and you could tell how gimmicky it was, along with the lack of blood when someone was killed during the Naomi Watts lead trials. There doesn’t have to be an excessive amount but it at least has to be noticeable that someone has died and not just cut away when it got too hard to look at.

I don’t blame anyone who has given up hope on this and had no intention of seeing it as it was almost laughable because of how badly produce it was and how ridiculous the story had become. Nothing on the screen was ever motivated and hardly fits in with its previous two films.Allegiant is almost a complete deviation. It felt like a TV movie on the big screen.

One of the only positive lights I can see in the future of this series is that it will finally be over this time next year with Theo James hopefully using this as a platform to other films so he can better his career and Miles Teller is able say this was only a bump in the road so he can continue to give performances like that he did in that of Whiplash.

Even if you haven’t read the books, it was a disappointing cinema experience.

Film-O-Meter: 3/10.

Golden Globe 2017 Predictions.

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FILM.

BEST PICTURE – DRAMA

  • Hacksaw Ridge.
  • Hell or High Water.
  • Lion.
  • Manchester by the Sea.
  • Moonlight.

BEST PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • 20th Century Women.
  • Deadpool.
  • Florence Foster Jenkins.
  • La La Land.
  • Sing Street.

BEST DIRECTOR

  • Damien Chazelle, La La Land.
  • Tom Ford, Nocturnal Animals.
  • Mel Gibson, Hacksaw Ridge.
  • Barry Jenkins, Moonlight.
  • Kenneth Lonergan, Manchester by the Sea.

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

  • Damien Chazelle, La La Land
  • Tom Ford, Nocturnal Animals.
  • Barry Jenkins, Moonlight.
  • Kenneth Lonergan, Manchester by the Sea.
  • Taylor Sheridan, Hell or High Water.

BEST ACTOR – DRAMA

  • Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea.
  • Joel Edgerton, Loving.
  • Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge.
  • Viggo Mortensen, Captain Fantastic.
  • Denzel Washington, Fences.

BEST ACTRESS – DRAMA

  • Amy Adams, Arrival.
  • Jessica Chastain, Miss Sloane.
  • Isabelle Huppert, Elle.
  • Ruth Negga, Loving.
  • Natalie Portman, Jackie.

BEST ACTOR – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Colin Farrell, The Lobster.
  • Ryan Gosling, La La Land.
  • Hugh Grant, Florence Foster Jenkins.
  • Jonah Hill, War Dogs.
  • Ryan Reynolds, Deadpool.

BEST ACTRESS – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Annette Bening, 20th Century Women.
  • Lily Collins, Rules Don’t Apply.
  • Hailee Steinfeld, The Edge of Seventeen.
  • Emma Stone, La La Land.
  • Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

  • Mahershala Ali, Moonlight.
  • Jeff Bridges, Hell or High Water.
  • Simon Helberg, Florence Foster Jenkins.
  • Dev Patel, Lion.
  • Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Nocturnal Animals.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

  • Viola Davis, Fences.
  • Naomie Harris, Moonlight.
  • Nicole Kidman, Lion.
  • Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures.
  • Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea.

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

  • Divines.
  • Elle.
  • Neruda.
  • The Salesman.
  • Toni Erdmann.

BEST ANIMATED FILM

  • Kubo and the Two Strings.
  • Moana.
  • My Life as a Zucchini.
  • Sing.
  • Zootopia.

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

  • Nicholas Britell, Moonlight.
  • Justin Hurwitz, La La Land.
  • Johann Johannsson, Arrival.
  • Dustin O’Halloran and Hauschka, Lion.
  • Hans Zimmer, Pharrell Williams, and Benjamin Wallfisch, Hidden Figures.

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

  • “Can’t Stop the Feeling!” by Max Martin, Shellback, and Justin Timberlake – Trolls.
  • “City of Stars” by Justin Hurwitz, Benj Pasek, and Justin Paul – La La Land.
  • “Faith” by Ryan Tedder, Stevie Wonder, and Francis Farewell Starlite – Sing.
  • “Gold” by Brian Burton, Stephen Gaghan, Daniel Pemberton, and Iggy Pop – Gold.
  • “How Far I’ll Go” by Lin-Manuel Miranda – Moana.

TELEVISION.

BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

  • The Crown.
  • Game of Thrones.
  • Stranger Things.
  • This Is Us.
  • Westworld.

BEST MINISERIES OR TV FILM

  • American Crime.
  • The Dresser.
  • The Night Manager.
  • The Night Of.
  • The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.

BEST TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Atlanta.
  • Black-ish.
  • Mozart in the Jungle.
  • Transparent.
  • Veep.

BEST ACTOR IN A TV SERIES – DRAMA

  • Rami Malek, Mr. Robot.
  • Bob Odenkirk, Better Call Saul.
  • Matthew Rhys, The Americans.
  • Lieve Schreiber, Ray Donovan.
  • Billy Bob Thorton, Goliath.

BEST ACTRESS IN A TV SERIES – DRAMA

  • Caitriona Balfe, Outlander.
  • Claire Foy, The Crown.
  • Keri Russell, The Americans.
  • Winona Ryder, Stranger Things.
  • Evan Rachel Wood, Westworld.

BEST ACTOR IN A TV SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Anthony Anderson, Black-ish.
  • Gael Garcia Bernal, Mozart in the Jungle.
  • Donald Glover, Atlanta.
  • Nick Nolte, Graves.
  • Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent.

BEST ACTRESS IN A TV SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Rachel Bloom, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep.
  • Sarah Jessica Parker, Divorce.
  • Issa Rae, Insecure.
  • Gina Rodriguez, Jane the Virgin.
  • Tracee Ellis Ross, Black-ish.

BEST ACTOR IN A MINISERIES OR TV FILM

  • Riz Ahmed, The Night Of.
  • Bryan Cranston, All the Way.
  • Tom Hiddleston, The Night Manager.
  • John Turturro, The Night Of.
  • Courtney B. Vance, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.

BEST ACTRESS IN A MINISERIES OR TV FILM

  • Felicity Huffman, American Crime.
  • Riley Keough, The Girlfriend Experience.
  • Sarah Paulson, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.
  • Charlotte Rampling, London Spy.
  • Kerry Washington, Confirmation.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A SERIES, MINISERIES, OR TV FILM

  • Sterling K. Brown, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.
  • Hugh Laurie, The Night Manager.
  • John Lithgow, The Crown.
  • Christian Slater, Mr. Robot.
  • John Travolta, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A SERIES, MINISERIES, OR TV FILM

  • Olivia Colman, The Night Manager.
  • Lena Heady, Game of Thrones.
  • Chrissy Metz, This Is Us.
  • Mandy Moore, This Is Us.
  • Thandie Newton, Westworld.