A well done limited location film.

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Green Room
 tells the story of a punk rock band that’s forced to fight for survival after witnessing a murder at a neo-Nazi skinhead bar.

If you’re going to go into this film, go into it knowing nothing. Although I’m not one for the horror genre, this was one of the few rare ones I could actually stand. It’s an adrenaline rush at it’s best where it becomes a confined game of cat and mouse between skinheads and an innocent party of band members but in saying this, it’s a film you don’t need to be caught up in the hype of. Like many things, if you get caught up in the hype of a film, it the end product of the film can ultimately a let down so like I said, go into it knowing nothing.

The one thing that I really liked about this film is it’s limited use of locations and how it remained relatively in one place. For me, anyway, it’s always interesting how the filmmakers make use of the singular location and how tension is maintained. I’d like to congratulate writer//director Jeremy Saulnier on his efforts on this part on maintaining the thrill and pace of the piece without it being overdone.

This film is also shows great use of the actors acquired to portray the tense script in a relatively low budget feature unlike in my previous review for Tullulah where brilliant actors obviously struggled quite obviously. It was quite interesting to see Patrick Stewart play something so creepily evil and something outside of his more well known parts of Charles Xavier in the X-Men franchise or Jean-Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

There were times, however, where I was often quite uncertain of the movements of the characters and motivations weren’t entirely clear. Though the audience will maintain sympathy for the characters on screen, the core of the fact is that there’s way to many times where I was totally unclear on what was actually occurring and why the skinheads were behaving like the were.

In the end, the world of the film remains the one strong point of the film and we’re sucked into it from the opening moments.

Film-O-Meter: 5/10.

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